Youth Voice: Sex, Gender, and Identity 101

Erin is a student and Peer Educator volunteering with CHATpdx.

Check out their new blog at theindividualgender.blogspot.com

In this world, there is a misconception by major groups of people that believe that sex and gender are the same exact thing. This is incorrect. By reading the basics of Sex, Gender, and Sexual Identity.

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For starters, what is sex? Sex is based on the biological characteristics used to label people as male or female such as  X and Y chromosomes,  internal and external sex organs, hormonal levels and things like hair growth and breast development. Most people think that there is only male and female, but that isn’t true. Some people can be born intersex, which is a general term used for a variety of conditions where a person is born with biological characteristics (such as hormones, chromosomes, reproductive or sexual anatomy) that don’t seem to fit the typical definitions of female or male.

Gender

And Gender? Your gender identity is how you identify and present yourself, for example as a boy or man, or as a girl or woman, or gender neutral. Your gender can be what ever, even if it isn’t the same as your biological sex, which is called transgender . People express their gender in many ways, expressing your gender is a spectrum of feminine to masculine. Things such as race, culture, age, ability and even your personality can influence the way someone precises their own gender.

Sexual Identity

Sexual identity is based on feelings,attractions and desires. There is a great spectrum of sexuality, and there is a difference between sexual identity and sexual behavior, for example, someone could be straight but still hookup with someone of the same gender. An example of sexual identity is asexual, having no sexual attraction to anyone.

Finally, we come to pronouns. A pronoun is how someone expresses their gender. A woman may prefer feminine pronouns (her,she), just like a gender neutral person prefers pronouns that don’t disclose male/female, such as (they,them,per,perself). And,also, you should always use gender neutral pronouns, so you don’t mistakes someones gender, which can cause mental health issues.

So, in conclusion, I hope that this has expanded your knowledge.

I’m A Girl Who Wanted To Be A Boy

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I’m A Girl Who Wanted To Be A Boy

” I look at this list as a whole, and I don’t see a girl or a boy, but a child. I wanted to play outside, I wanted to draw with all the colors of the wind, I wanted games with sharks and dinosaurs and I wanted dolls (creepy, creepy dolls). I’m not saying this to let you know how cool I was—I think my use of the word “pest” takes care of that for me—I’m saying that this should serve as a reminder that kids enjoy all kinds of toys, and those toys don’t have to be SO. VERY. GENDERED. Because it can mess with kids’ heads in very lasting ways.

As a child, I saw that girls were only allowed to like dolls and the color pink. But I liked blue and dinosaurs, so I assumed that I couldn’t be a girl. And to my confused child brain, if I didn’t want to be a girl, I must want to be a boy. A – B = C. ”

– Emily Shepard

http://www.rolereboot.org/culture-and-politics/details/2013-08-when-i-was-a-boy

What It’s Like Being A Faggot At A Black Barber Shop

“For almost a decade my staple barber shop was Smooth’s in New Haven, right on Whalley Avenue, right next to Popeye’s. I’d roll out of my dorm on a Saturday morning and put on the most heterosexual, straight-acting drag I could think of and, really, whatever was left on the floor: sneakers and my ugliest, least skinny pair of jeans, a plain white t-shirt. And I would even sometimes wear a baseball cap or a hoodie and cover my head, just so my queerness wouldn’t be legible. This wasn’t me, this was the boy I needed to be to get a haircut.”

So thoughtful – This is what intersectionality really means.

Thought Catalog

When I was younger my grandmother forced me to go to the barber shop and I hated going because it really hurt. But I had to look presentable for the Lord and, well, “Pretty Hurts,” Beyoncé would tell me. Now I barely go two weeks without getting my hair cut, but I hate going for different reasons. After more than 20 years of linings and shape ups, going to the black barber still gives me serious anxiety.

They give me anxiety because black or latino barber shops can be some of the most homophobic spaces for gay men of color.

For almost a decade my staple barber shop was Smooth’s in New Haven, right on Whalley Avenue, right next to Popeye’s. I’d roll out of my dorm on a Saturday morning and put on the most heterosexual, straight-acting drag I could think of and, really, whatever was left on the…

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