Male Birth Control that may also kill HIV?

risug_mechanism

risug_mechanism

Male Birth Control that can also kill HIV?

More often than not, the responsibility of preventing pregnancy falls on female-bodied individuals – birth control pills, the patch, IUDs, insertive condoms, etc. But what about guys who want to take responsibility too? Or women for whom a lot of the standard options don’t work?

Enter a new option: for years, researchers in India have been looking at a technique called RISUGTM (reversible inhibition of sperm under guidance). Basically, a doctor injects a gel into the vas deferens, which are the tubes that the sperm flows through on the way to ejaculation. The gel hardens as it coats the walls of the tubes, and tears apart the sperm as they pass by so that they can’t cause pregnancy. It’s a non-surgical procedure that can last for twenty or more years, and is easily reversible by injecting a solution that dissolves the gel. Within a few months of reversal, fertility should return to normal.

But it doesn’t stop there – now researchers are talking about ways to make the gel also prevent transmission of HIV. There are different

Penis Anatomy

Penis Anatomy

ideas about how it would work – like inactivating HIV in sperm or having the gel release drugs that would kill the HIV downstream (because some components of semen don’t pass through the vas deferens – they come from the seminal vesicles, prostate and bulbourethral glands).

Of course, it’s still in trials so we won’t be seeing it on the market any time soon, but if it works this could be huge! Not only would it be another option for preventing pregnancy, but it would also provide a new way for serodiscordant couples to prevent transmission of HIV to the negative partner.

What do you think? Would you try it? Would you trust your partner if they said they’d had it done?

Sources: http://www.newmalecontraception.org/risug.htm

http://www.medical-hypotheses.com/article/S0306-9877%2805%2900096-4/abstract

Male-Sperm

Male-Sperm

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What does the Asian Pacific Islander National HIV/AIDS Awareness Day mean to me?

What does the Asian Pacific Islander National HIV/AIDS Awareness Day mean to me?

I have never heard of the Banyan Tree Project nor National Asian & Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day, which falls next month on May 19. Each year A&PI Awareness day is sponsored by Banyan Tree Project. National Asian Pacific Islander HIV/AIDS Awareness Day goal is too highlight the negative stigma, lack of communication and general awareness of HIV/AIDS in the API community. The theme for 2012 is “Saving face can’t make you safe. Talk about HIV–for me, for you, for everyone.” An idea that is very important to highlight in our community.
Growing up as a Queer Chinese Asian American; I have seen the hush, hush of just talking about the queer community. It’s something you don’t acknowledge nor talk about subject. Heck, I didn’t even know that there are community groups out there dedicating themselves to informing and educating the Asian Pacific Islander Queer community. Over the years, I have to learn to embrace myself, my community and all those that are a part of it. It was recently that I became even deeper part of the queer community and making myself part of the local API group, Asian Pacific Islander Pride, which had made me aware locally of the Asian Pacific Islander community and events. This is step one of many steps in my life to make myself a more engaging part of the API community. I’m proud for simply reaching out and help to increase awareness, decrease negative stereotypes and providing information that helps keep people informed.
Just like the other National HIV/AIDS Awareness Days, it is very important to embrace awareness into the ethnic groups of all backgrounds as those are the ones who generally are looked over and forgotten. I am glad that we, the Queer Asian community, are standing up and putting a voice to bring education and awareness to help make HIV/AIDS less of an impact while ending the stigma of being Queer in API community. The motto this year is for you to make our issue, your issue. Go and simply Speak Up! Get yourself involved in an organization, like Asian Pacific Pride, that you feel strongly with. It’s all starts with YOU.
What does A&PI HIV/AIDS Awareness Day mean to you?

The desexualization of bullying – A deeper look at bullying’s sexual undertones

Posted on February 16, 2012

by: Kris Gowen, originally posted on Kris Gowens Blog

 

Kids Bullying

You Can Stop Bullying

I was going to try to come up with a fancier more accessible title, but I can’t right now. But I sure better by May! I’ve been invited to speak at an bullying awareness event in Austin Texas this May. While I jumped at this opportunity to share my work (and support my friend who is organizing the event), I quickly realized that I am no bullying expert. But, for better or for worse, not being a total expert on a topic as not stopped me before…

I am an expert on adolescent sexuality and sexual development. I also have a pretty good handle on youth and technology and how that impacts their development (hence, this blog). So, how to use my strengths in the context of this upcoming event? Tie all of these issues together — sexuality, technology, and bullying. I have found my comfort zone!

What’s odd is that while so much of bullying has a sexual undertone or is blatantly about sex or sexuality or at least gender, most bullying curricula, anti-bullying campaigns, etc., do not acknowledge this important association. Bullying is seen as harassment, teasing, isolation, and assault. But under no circumstances should one put the word “sexual” in front of any of those terms and call it bullying.

Why this separation? Why not discuss sexual harassment while discussing bullying? Where is the conversation about sexual respect and self-worth in curricula that addresses the need to be nice to others? Are (anti) bullying experts afraid to talk about sex? Does it complicate things too much? Does it narrow their message?

Whatever the reason, I think it’s important to accept the fact that a lot of bullying has to do with sexuality. An obvious example is about name-calling due to sexual orientation and/or gender expression (and the “Think Before You Speak” campaign does a good job of calling this out). But what about sexting under pressure? Spreading rumors? Calling someone a ho or slut? These are unfortunately very common ways to bullying another, but where’s the conversation about the sexual components?

I hope to be able to speak more eloquently about this topic in the future. For now, I will continue to explore this rift and see if I can’t begin to bridge the gap between my interests and the important work done to decrease bullying among youth.

 

It’s your turn, what do you think we should do to change this? How has society removed Sexuality from bullying? Is this a bad thing? Comment and share your thoughts and then share this blog with someone you know.

Bully Victim Bystander

Stand Up Against Bullying

 

What’s in a name?

Some of you have asked, “why the name CHATmosphere Ernesto?” We’ll I’ll tell you why. A few months ago we came to our facebook page with challenge. We wanted our “fans” to submit their own ideas of what we should name our blog. Much to our surprise many people wrote in with ideas like:

CHATter Box    CHATblog    Not your parents blog    Sex-ish      Body-talk      sexCHAT Off the Curb

And of course CHATmosphere. After a few rounds of choosing favorites, (done by an anonymous panel of experts, or sort of experts actually) they arrived at the final conclusion that CHATmosphere would be the best name to call our blog.

Mitchell is a 21 year old student at Portland State University studying English and Philosophy with an end goal of becoming a superhero. Here is what our good friend Mitchell S. had to say about why he submitted CHATmosphere as a name for our blog.

How did you first hear about CHATpdx?:

CHATpdx utilizes social media via Facebook and Twitter etc. to grab the attention of youth around the city.

So inevitably, they found me on Facebook which isn’t all that hard of thing to do.

Why “CHATmosphere”?

Discussion of safe sex, youth sex, sex in general should be inviting and comfortable. CHATmosphere is a place that’s safe for youth to drop in and CHAT; it’s an atmosphere of community, advice and involvement.

What does HIV mean to you?

HIV—knowledge of it—is a reality of a sexually active life

Why HIV is still an important issue for youth?

Knowledge is power: knowledge of prevention, knowledge of your status, knowledge of support, all of these things empower youth to take control of their own sexual lives and assert what’s important.

For the winning entry Mitchell got a giftcard to Trader Joes. Keep a look out for more contests in the future. With any luck you might be our next winner.

Film Friday

Condom Building

Thank you AIDS awareness

Every friday I will be posting an educational, entertaining, or just plain weird video on our site. Hopefully it will prompt discussion from you or at least get you thinking differently about an issue.

This week, Condoms.

I know, condoms are nothing new and we seem to be getting the “just wear it” message all over the place, but I believe they are still an important thing to be talking about. The modern day latex condom has been around since the early 1900’s (approx. 1920) In the modern age, condoms are most often made from latex, but some are made from other materials such as polyurethane, polyisoprene, or lamb intestine. A female condom (or insertive condom) is also available, most often made of polyurethane.

Condoms have been used for at least 400 years. Yeh I know, can you imagine Louis XIV , Michelangelo, or Isaac Newton using condoms? Well they might have. Since the nineteenth century, they have been one of the most popular methods of contraception in the world. While widely accepted in modern times, condoms have generated some controversy, primarily over what role they should play in sex education classes. I say, put them on buildings and in lunch boxes (maybe not really), but they should play a role in sex education. I mean really, when is the last time you heard of someone being hurt from having more education?

Anywho, if you want to know more things to do with condoms, watch this video.

So tell me, how do you think condoms should be used in schools? Where would you like to see condom ads? Where should they not be? What other roles should condoms play in society? I can’t wait to hear what you come up with.

 

-Ernesto